DEPRESSION

Words = power. But what kind?

I have written often about the impact of our spoken words. Towards others, yes but as much to ourselves. Words contain power. They might be mankind’s most powerful tool. But what kind of power? Healthy power? Destructive power?

I read a post recently from someone who suffers from depression. I suggested a couple of ideas. One was exercise, which a huge body of research has shown to be as effective as medication for mild to moderate depression. I also suggested this person pay attention to the words they spoke, as very often we don’t realize how we exacerbate our depression  by using negative or harsh words.

Other people also offered their suggestions in an effort to help. But I read one comment from someone who seemed intent on disqualifying the advice that was offered. This person felt that any advice that was counter to medication was just frivolous and not to be considered. I believe the comment was,  “It doesn’t do any good.”

I wrote the other day about routines and how the simple things in life are often our first offensive move against depression. I want to reiterate that sound research has proven that quite often very ordinary practices can relieve depression.

Medication alone is not the total or only solution.  

I haven’t counted the books I own or have read about depression but they probably number into the hundreds. Not even books that strongly promote medication, suggest that medication alone is enough. I continue to be amazed that many who suffer from depression have not done their research. Or if they have, they still ignore much of the advice. It just seems to0 simple to work and, let’s face it, depression is anything but simple.

Believe me I understand why. I remember the days when all I wanted to do was take a pill to make the pain go away. And I did. I took anti-depressants for many years. But after a great deal of reading, I learned there were better ways to deal with the illness that didn’t have the side effects I experienced. That was the beginning of my recovery.

I guess I don’t understand why a person would limit their recovery to only one approach for dealing with their depression when there is so much literature that suggests there are additional things we can try. For me, I hurt so much that I was determined to get to the bottom of it and not be dependent on pills the rest of my life. (I direct you to my “about me” page for a chronicling of my story.)

I also decided that I can learn to live with some emotional discomfort. It’s not the end of the world if I have a few bad days. We do we eve think it should be otherwise, anyway?

I’m writing this because I want to encourage you to look at other approaches and not be so short-sighted as to believe that a pill is the only answer. (I’m well aware that for some people medication is the answer but for those same people, medication probably won’t provide total relief. Therefore, it becomes even more important to learn as much as one can. Medication is also sometimes needed in the beginning of the recovery process so our minds can be clear while we develop strategies that work for us.)

So, as I suggested the other day, one simple thing you can try is watch your spoken words. I highly recommend a book by Joyce Meyer (Doggone, she beat me to it!) that reinforces what I’m saying.

God bless and I hope you have a good day.

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