Tag: faith not fear

How Christians should behave in the midst of the Covid-19 crisis

(I have no idea how this post got posted this morning before it was edited but then if you read yesterday’s post, you will know why. I was probably not over it this morning. So I apologize for the repeat. Our son is going to be OK. It wasn’t a heart attack and he will be heading home tomorrow.)

First of all, let’s all agree that God is ultimately in control of the final outcome of this world, even though Jesus himself stated that satan is in control of this present world.

As Christians, we are to trust that no matter what happens, our ultimate destiny is as it always was. Nothing can change that. Heaven awaits us.

But let’s be honest, most of don’t want to lose a loved one to this virus. We don’t want to get it either. We are human. We have fears.

Thank goodness, there are hundreds of verses in Scripture that tell us to take our fear to God. When God says, “Fear not”, he always adds more to the verse. He is loving enough to tell us why we don’t have to fear. It would serve us well to reread some of those verses now for reassurance.

Some Christians are fond of saying how fear is from the enemy which, of course, it is. But we should remember that. Satan is the author of all our destructive emotions, including pride and boasting. Satan is also the author of false declarations that we aren’t afraid. Everyone feels fear at some point in their life. To suggest anything else is boastful and simply not true.

Our fear, the universality of it, is precisely why it is addressed over three hundred times in scripture. The victory over fear lies in admitting fear not in denying it. There is a difference between pretending we feel no fear and admitting to feeling fear yet finding comfort in our relationship with God. And if you want the best example of fear, look at our Savior in the Garden of Gethsemane. You don’t ask for a trial to be removed if you aren’t fearful.

If I didn’t feel fear (You can call it concern if you want, but I call it what it is, fear.), I wouldn’t be driven to my knees to pray.

But sometimes Christians, in their sanctimonious attitudes react to these kinds of situations with a ridiculous sense that this can’t possibly happen to them. There are those who cling to the false notion that because we are Christians, nothing bad can happen to us. ‘We just need to have faith.” As if everyone who has died from cancer, for example, had none of it.

That’s beyond arrogant and self-righteous. People who believe that way, believe that their prayers are more effective than someone else’s. They believe if anything bad happens to someone, it’s because of either sin or that their faith wasn’t strong enough.

The sin part of that belief has already been addressed by Jesus in the example of the young blind man. “Who sinned?”, was the question asked. Jesus replied, “No one”. (John 9:1-12)

Does sin play a part in some illnesses? I’m sure it does. Does lack of faith play a part at times? I’m sure it does. But that is not for us to determine for anyone other than ourselves.

As Christians, our concern is supposed to be for others. We are staying home and avoiding unnecessary exposure to protect not just ourselves but others. Remember, you can easily have the virus and not know it. And if you do, you are exposing others to it unwittingly.

At the same time, we shouldn’t panic. But let’s not use our “faith” as a reason to ignore the warnings. Remember, this isn’t just about us. It’s about all those other people we come in contact with.

It’s about loving our neighbor. And if we are truly loving our neighbor, we should be watching out for them.

So be rational, but not radical.

The world is not ending. We don’t have to cower in fear but we shouldn’t throw caution to the wind either. And it seems to me that most people are at one end or the other instead of in the middle.

For example, I have purchased enough “supplies” to last a couple of weeks. But there will be occasions that I will have to grocery shopping and I will do that.

I have a friend who is definitely home-bound through all this. For her to be isolated for weeks would be terrible. So we have figured out a totally safe way for me to visit her. I will use Clorox wipes to open all the doors and anything I happen to touch I will sanitize. I will bring my own coffee. She will know when I’m at the door so she can move away at least six feet. We will have our conversations at that distance. As the weather gets nicer we can go outside. I will use wipes as I leave as well. Her children are on board with this.

I will use this approach with anyone I visit or who visits me. To totally cut-off ourselves isn’t healthy emotionally. And this situation is predicted to get only worse. But we can be smart and still socialize in creative but safe ways.

Americans are the toughest most resilient people there are. IF, and it really is an IF, we all do our part and put everyone else first we can nip this virus sooner rather than later.

And whatever we do as Christians, let us not imply this is from God as a punishment on the world. Not one person alive knows if that is true or not. This is a time to be drawing others to God through our actions not turning them away.

God bless and have a good day.

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